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Backyard Bird Food Chart

What Foods for What Birds?

The experts at Bird Watcher's Digest have compiled this informative food and seed chart to help you attract the birds that you want to your feeders.
Quail, pheasants Cracked corn, millet, wheat, milo
Pigeons, doves Millet, cracked corn, wheat, milo, niger, buckwheat, sunflower, baked goods
Roadrunner Meat scraps, hamburger, suet
Hummingbirds Plant nectar, small insects, sugar solution
Woodpeckers Suet, meat scraps, sunflower hearts/seed, cracked corn, peanuts, fruits, sugar solution
Jays Peanuts, sunflower, suet, meat scraps, cracked corn, baked goods
Crows, magpies, and nutcracker Meat scraps, suet, cracked corn, peanuts, baked goods, leftovers, dog food
Titmice, chickadees Peanut kernels, sunflower, suet, peanut butter
Nuthatches Suet, suet mixes, sunflower hearts and seed, peanut kernels, peanut butter
Wrens, creepers Suet, suet mixes, peanut butter, peanut kernels, bread, fruit, millet (wrens)
Mockingbirds, thrashers, catbirds Halved apple, chopped fruits, baked goods, suet, nutmeats, millet (thrashers), soaked raisins, currants, sunflower hearts
Robins, bluebirds, other thrushes Suet, suet mixes, mealworms, berries, baked goods, chopped fruits, soaked raisins, currants, nutmeats, sunflower hearts
Kinglets Suet, suet mixes, baked goods
Waxwings Berries, chopped fruits, canned peas, currants, raisins
Warblers Suet, suet mixes, fruit, baked goods, sugar solution, chopped nutmeats
Tanagers Suet, fruits, sugar solution, mealworms, baked goods
Cardinals, grosbeaks, pyrrhuloxias (a type of cardinal) Sunflower, safflower, cracked corn, millet, fruit
Towhees, juncos Millet, sunflower, cracked corn, peanuts, baked goods, nutmeats
Sparrows, buntings Millet, sunflower hearts, black-oil sunflower, cracked corn, baked goods
Blackbirds, starlings Cracked corn, milo, wheat, table scraps, baked goods, suet
Orioles Halved oranges, apples, berries, sugar solution, grape jelly, suet, suet mixes, soaked raisins, and currants
Finches, siskins Thistle (niger), sunflower hearts, black-oil sunflower seed, millet, canary seed, fruits, peanut kernels, suet mixes

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