What do birds need now? Water! In this issue we provide tips for water features, do-it-yourself ideas to make your birdbath appealing, and more!
An e-newsletter brought to you by the publishers of Bird Watcher’s Digest and Watching Backyard Birds. Proudly sponored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics.

What Birds Need Most Right Now: Water!

Throughout North America, August usually brings the driest weather of the year. Natural water sources for drinking and bathing can be few and far between, so by providing a birdbath or other water feature, you'll help the birds get through the dog days, and you will likely be rewarded by attracting species that don't visit your feeding station.
Native Ad Pic

Optics for Your BEST Birding Moments

Redstart Birding is THRILLED to add Steiner Optics to our carefully curated lineup of exceptional birding binoculars. Designed with bird watchers in mind, the Steiner line features generous fields of view, specialized focusing mechanisms, and much more!

How to Make Your Birdbath More Appealing to Small Birds
When you were a kid, did you ever look at the deep end of a swimming pool with a twinge of fear? Many of our favorite backyard birds have similar instincts. It’s one reason why songbirds don’t bathe in the open water of backyard swimming pools—it’s far too deep for them. If you want to offer smaller birds a place to bathe, there are a couple of simple ways to make your existing birdbath accessible to them.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

My Way: Do-It-Yourself Birdbath Tips
Check out these clever reader-submitted ideas! With just a few items you likely have on hand, you can easily make your own dripper or a pint-sized birdbath to accommodate small birds.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

Hummingbird Migration: How Do They Know When to Go?
Many of our common hummingbird species depart from their breeding ranges in mid-to-late summer and head to greener pastures for the winter. For most of them this involves a southbound migration to the tropics of Mexico and Central America. But how do they know when it's time to go?
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png


38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

#BirdsOnTheBrain
ATTENTION, BIRDWIRE SUBSCRIBERS: We want to hear from you! Each issue of BirdWire includes a poll question for our audience. Visit our website to offer your input and see results from your fellow readers!
This issue's poll question: Do you have water features in your yard? (Select all that apply).
• A standard, shallow bird bath
• Dripper, mister, or recirculating fountain
• Artificial stream or pond with moving water
• I don't have any water features.
RESULTS OF OUR LAST POLL: In our last poll, we asked if you intentionally landscape your yard to attract birds. A whopping 66% said, "Yes! My yard is designed for birds more than humans!" 26% have added a feature or two for the birds. 4% intend to landscape for the birds when they can spare the time, and an additional 4% don't have a yard to landscape. But, NO ONE said, "Nah, not for me!" Hooray for you! And thanks to all who participated.



38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

Meet the BWD Family: Emily Nichols, Events Coordinator
As anyone who has traveled as part of a group knows, it takes a special person to organize such an adventure, to accommodate the needs and wishes of all the people in the party, to do so with bottomless patience and cheerfulness. If you have traveled with Bird Watcher’s Digest on one of our Reader Rendezvous over the past several years, then you know how lucky we are to have found all of these qualities and more in Emily Nichols, our events coordinator.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

Out There with the Birds Episode #73: LGBTQ Birders of North America
In late 2019, BWD publisher Wendy Clark chatted with Jennifer Rycenga, Raymond VanBuskirk, and Michael Retter—all avid birders and members of the group QBNA (LGBTQ Birders of North America). The QBNA’s mission is to facilitate communication among LGBTQ birders and their allies in North America and Hawaii. Join host Wendy Clark, Jennifer, Raymond, and Michael for this "pre-COVID," candid conversation about QBNA, diversity, and how a shared love of birds, birders, and birding can unify all people around the world.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
On Newsstands Now:
Watching Backyard Birds: August 2020
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
If you love backyard birds, then you should be reading Watching Backyard Birds. It's the ONLY North American magazine devoted exclusively to backyard birds and the people who watch and enjoy them. Created by the friendly staff at Bird Watcher's Digest, every issue of Watching Backyard Birds is full of engaging, entertaining, and enlightening content and images.
  • Get one year (6 bimonthly issues) for only $16.00*
  • Print subscribers get the digital issue FREE!
* Canadian and international shipping apply. Orders shipping to Ohio are subject to sales tax.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
OUR COVER SPECIES
Cooper's Hawk
A native of dense forest, the Cooper’s hawk has adapted to our tree-filled suburban environment with remarkable ease.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
SPECIAL FEATURE
A Bee-resistant Hummingbird Feeder?
Editor Dawn Hewitt conducts a pseudo-scientific experiment to see which of her hummingbird feeders attracts the fewest bees.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
SPECIAL FEATURE
A Ray of Sunshine in Troubling Times
The privilege of watching young hummingbirds embark on their life journey in her southern Arizona yard has helped contributor Marion Ball overcome the worries and concerns of the pandemic.


Follow BWD BWD on Pinterest Like Us on Facebook BWD on Instagram BWD on YouTube
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
Copyright © 2020 Bird Watcher’s Digest. All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.