Spring migration may be winding down for many species, but others get a late start, and sightings are picking up right now. Have you seen these birds?
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Test Your Late-Spring Migrant Skills!

Jessica Melfi | Assistant Editor, Bird Watcher's DigestBy Jessica Melfi
Assistant Editor | Bird Watcher’s Digest

Spring migration may be winding down for many species, but others get a later start, and reports of them are picking up right now. A number of warblers, thrushes, and flycatchers, among others, peak in late May. They may be a bit more difficult to locate as the trees continue to leaf out, but the mass movement of northern-bound birds isn’t over yet! How many of these late migrants can you identify?

Details Matter.

Birding is all about the details. Eye color. Bill curves. Wing bars. Missing any of these is frustrating. Seeing them clearly helps make field identification much easier and the entire experience much more enjoyable.
Mystery Migrant #1
Mystery Migrant #1
Nice hat! This distinctively crowned warbler is one of the smallest and most easily recognized in the U.S. It often raises and flicks its tail as it bounces between branches.
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Mystery Migrant #2
Mystery Migrant #2
Classified as a warbler until recently, this skulker is larger and has a proportionally longer tail and a heavier bill than wood warblers. Listen for its extensive cascade of whistles, gurgles, and hoots, often delivered from an exposed perch or during an exaggerated flight display.
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Mystery Migrant #3
Mystery Migrant #3
Wichety wichety wichety! This species’ distinctive call and broad black mask make it one of our most easily recognized warblers.
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Events and Happenings
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Fall Migration Rendezvous: Hog and Monhegan Islands—Only 6 Spots Left!
There are few American landscapes as iconic or as bird-rich as the island-studded coast of Maine, especially during autumn migration. Monhegan Island is the perfect distillation of both natural beauty and the Maine coast’s remarkable tendency to concentrate migrants, sometimes in astounding numbers. Beloved Bird Watcher’s Digest columnist and long-time Hog Island instructor Scott Weidensaul will be present on this Rendezvous along with your trusty BWD staffers Dawn Hewitt, Emily Jones, and Raymond VanBuskirk.
Best of This Birding Life: Birds and Music: Jonathan Meiberg of Shearwater
Best of This Birding Life: Birds and Music: Jonathan Meiberg of Shearwater
Originally recorded in 2010, this episode of TBL features host Bill Thompson, III, interviewing Jonathan Meiberg, a birder and leader of the indie-rock band Shearwater. Both a musician and a bird watcher, Jonathan Meiberg sparked on music at an early age, but he did not catch the birding bug until his college years while on a visit to the Falkland Islands. In this episode, Bill and Jonathan discuss a range of topics including songwriting, bird behavior, life birds, and the vagaries of small travel guitars. Interspersed throughout the interview are short samples of Shearwater’s music. This was one of Bill’s favorite episodes!
OTWTB #54: An Interview with Bill Thompson, III, Part II
Out There with the Birds Episode #54: An Interview with Bill Thompson, III, Part II
In Part 2 of Ben’s interview with BT3, published posthumously, Bill talks about his love of travel as a way of connecting with nature and people, and recalls some of his his birding mentors and more memorable birding adventures. Bill also talks about his love of music and what it means to him. Also hear Bill’s thoughts on the evolution of birding, and why he’s hopeful about the next generation shaping the future of bird watching. We end with a recording of Bill singing one of his songs with his band, The Rain Crows.
Vortex and Redstart Birding: Best Optics Experience During and After Your Order!
Extraordinary Quality and Comfort for Birding and Beyond: Lowa Boots.
On Newsstands Now:
Watching Backyard Birds: June 2019
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SPECIES PROFILE
The Best Way to See Chimney Swifts
Are chimney swifts on your backyard bird list? They are common in cities, towns and suburbs, but are often overlooked. WBB contributor W. Todd Parker recounts the opportunities in which he became acquainted with these delightful little birds.
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SPECIAL FEATURE
Nandina Berries Kill
Warning: All parts of this common landscaping plant are toxic to wildlife, pets, and livestock. Birds are especially susceptible to nandina poisoning because of the shrub’s beautiful and enticing red fruit.
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ASK BIRDSQUATCH
Strange Offerings for Birds: Popcorn and Pet Fur?
Our hairiest columnist answers reader questions about feeding birds popcorn, offering pet fur to nesting birds, and how to wean hummingbirds from a nectar feeder in anticipation of moving.
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