Spring migration is in full swing! Attract migrants to your yard with water, play some bird bingo, try a quiz on tanagers, and much more!
An e-newsletter brought to you by the publishers of Bird Watcher’s Digest and Watching Backyard Birds. Proudly sponored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics.

Ten Birds to Attract with Water

Moving water in your backyard created by a mister or dripper is a fantastic way to attract birds. During spring and fall migration, when species not normally found in your area are passing through, an attractive birdbath can make them stop to bathe or drink. Make sure your bath is clean and in a spot where you can easily observe it throughout the day. Here are a few of the interesting birds to watch for at your birdbath.
Native Ad Pic

Dreaming of your next birding expedition?

The Adirondacks has a never-ending mix of uplands and lowlands, wetlands and boreal forests, making it the perfect destination for birders looking to check out a wide range of avian species.

Have You Tried Bird Bingo?
Like many of you, the staff at Bird Watcher’s Digest has been spending a lot of time lately in our backyards and local patches keeping an eye on the birds. To keep things interesting, especially as avian activity ramps up with spring migration, we offer a fun twist on your socially distant birding—Bird Bingo!
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

It's Time for Tanagers: Take Our Pop Quiz!
From spring through late summer, tanagers brighten our world with their tropical flair. Each of these species winters south of the United States; in some cases, as far south as Bolivia and Argentina. We share North America with them for a few short, warm months. How much do you know about these colorful birds?
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

Top 10 Reasons to Be a New Bird Watcher
More people are watching birds today than ever before; its popularity as a pastime has been growing rapidly over the past few years—especially the past few months! Birding’s tremendous ripple effect as a hobby has influenced everything from ecotourism to optics manufacturers. But why do people take up bird watching?
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png


38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

#BirdsOnTheBrain
ATTENTION, BIRDWIRE SUBSCRIBERS: We want to hear from you! Each issue of BirdWire includes a poll question for our audience. Visit our website to offer your input and see results from your fellow readers!
Have you introduced someone to bird watching this spring?
RESULTS OF LAST ISSUE'S POLL: In the last issue of BirdWire, we asked if you had spied any nests in your backyard this spring. We have a lot of observant bird watchers in the audience! 38% have seen two or more nests, 43% have observed at least one nest, and only 19% have yet to see a nest. Thanks to all who participated!



38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

The Legacy of Bird Watcher's Digest, Part 3
Editor Dawn Hewitt continues the tale of BWD's colorful history. In the final installment, she takes a look at how the heart of BWD has always been about connecting birders, and connecting people with birds. 
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png

Out There with the Birds Podcast Episode #67: The Perils and Pitfalls of Editing a Bird Magazine
Bird Watcher’s Digest Editor Dawn Hewitt provided the keynote presentation for the eighth annual (and first-ever virtual) Hatchie BirdFest, on April 24, 2020. Her talk was a nod to her beloved, late boss, Bill Thompson, III, who occasionally presented a perpetually evolving talk titled “The Perils and Pitfalls of Bird Watching.” Dawn’s is an informative celebration of the thrills and challenges of assembling North America’s oldest popular birding magazine. This podcast also features a beautiful and moving original song written by Bob Raines for the 2020 Hatchie BirdFest, and performed along with Sam Raines, titled “All That’s Left of Eden.”
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
On Newsstands Now:
Watching Backyard Birds: June 2020
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
If you love backyard birds, then you should be reading Watching Backyard Birds. It's the ONLY North American magazine devoted exclusively to backyard birds and the people who watch and enjoy them. Created by the friendly staff at Bird Watcher's Digest, every issue of Watching Backyard Birds is full of engaging, entertaining, and enlightening content and images.
  • Get one year (6 bimonthly issues) only $16.00*
  • Print subscribers get the digital issue FREE!
* Canadian and international shipping apply. Orders shipping to Ohio are subject to sales tax.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
OUR COVER SPECIES
Bullock's Oriole
While eight oriole species brighten backyards across the US, the Bullock's is a western specialty found fairly frequently in yards with scattered trees.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
ASK BIRDSQUATCH
Advice on Injured Birds and Identifying Buckthorn
Our hairiest columnist answers reader questions about how best to help a lame cardinal and on distinguishing native varieties of buckhorn that benefit wildlife.
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
WATCHER AT THE WINDOW
Beauty Is…
Is it possible to spend a lifetime in thrall of beauty? A country church sign sends naturalist Julie Zickefoose into a long reverie about the role of nature’s beauty in her life.


Follow BWD BWD on Pinterest Like Us on Facebook BWD on Instagram BWD on YouTube
38df6b32-2a0d-439f-b337-de2848dd3cd9.png
Copyright © 2020 Bird Watcher's Digest, All rights reserved.


Want to receive emails like this in your inbox?
You can join our mailing list »