A Canada jay pauses to rest in the fir trees of Mount Ranier State Park, Washington. Photo by Walter Siegmund / Wikimedia.

North America’s 10 Most Interesting Birds

If I asked you to produce a list of the top 10 most popular birds in North America, I am pretty sure you would be conjuring up images of large and/or glamorous species that are found everywhere, appear frequently in the popular literature and other media forms, and show up at feeders in backyards. BWD contributor Dr. David Bird decided to create his own top 10 list of North American birds based on those he deemed to have the most interesting behaviors. Find out what they are!
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