Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird (Photo: USFWS)

Rich, rusty brown feathers and a flaming gorget set the 3-3/4-inch-long male rufous hummingbird apart from all other hummingbirds. Green-backed females don a more subdued plumage, but members of both sexes challenge interlopers with a mechanical-sounding chp, chp, chp. These birds call the Pacific Northwest and northern Rockies up into Alaska home. Males assert their… See details »

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated hummingbird guarding his territory from the top of a tomato stake. (Photo: Joe Schneid/Creative Commons)

This 3 ¾-inch-long garden jewel known as the ruby-throated hummingbird makes its home in swamps, woodlands, parks, and gardens in much of eastern North America. It is the only species to nest east of the Great Plains. Members of both sexes emit a soft tchew to alert other hummingbirds to their presence. Males stake out… See details »

Costa’s Hummingbird

Costa's Hummingbird (Photo: Alan Vernon/Wikimedia Commons)

The hottest, most arid deserts of southern California and Arizona are home to the 3 ½-inch Costa’s hummingbird. Both the gorget and crown of the male blaze vibrant purple. A high-pitched tik often reveals the presence of territorial bird guarding his patch of blossoms. Female coloring of gray and green is more somber. Ocotillo, desert… See details »

Calliope Hummingbird

Calliope Hummingbird (Photo: Kati Fleming/Wikimedia)

At a tiny 3 ¼ inches in length, the Calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird in North America. The sparkling raylike magenta feathers of the male are unique among hummingbirds. Calliopes spend the brief summer at the highest elevations of the northern Rocky Mountains, where they can often be found foraging in meadows at the… See details »

Buff-bellied Hummingbird

Buff-bellied hummingbird by Harmony on Planet Earth / Flickr / Wikimedia Commons.

The bold, assertive personality of the 4 ¼-inch buff-bellied hummingbird makes it a garden favorite among the people who live within its restricted U.S. range in southern Texas. Strikingly different from any other bird, the buffbellies wear bronze-green feathers on its back and emerald-green feathers on its throat. The long chestnut tail is often fanned… See details »

Broad-tailed Hummingbird

Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Photo: Wikimedia Creative Commons)

These elegant 4-inch-long hummingbirds are considered the jewels of the Rockies because they are so frequently seen by residents and visitors alike. Their wing whistles and musical chirps fill the air of mountain meadows carpeted with larkspurs and penstemons. Every cabin that has a feeder is bound to be inundated by hordes of hungry broadtails… See details »

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird (Photo: Creative Commons)

This slender 3 ¾-inch bird is at home in a wide variety of situations in the western U.S. From isolated desert canyons to suburban homesites, a plaintive tchew note announces the presence of the black-chinned hummingbird. The name of the species comes from the velvety black feathers that make up the gorget, though males are… See details »

Anna’s Hummingbird

Anna's Hummingbird (Photo: Pat Durkin/Creative Commons)

The husky, 4-inch-long Anna’s hummingbird inhabited the chaparral-clad slopes of the Pacific Coast when giant condors still graced smog-free California skies. Yet, it has prospered along with rampant human development. Few hummingbirds have adapted as easily to the uneasy changes that replace savage wildlands with palaces of concrete and steel. In fact, Anna’s hummingbirds have… See details »

Allen’s Hummingbird

Allen's Hummingbird (Photo: Creative Commons)

Native to the Pacific Coast from southern California to southwestern Oregon, the 3 ¾-inch Allen’s hummingbird sports a bronze-green back and flame-colored gorget. Otherwise, these demons closely resemble their rusty-backed cousins. While feeding and defending territories they give the same mechanical-sounding chp, chp, chp as the rufous hummingbird. Females are indistinguishable from female rufous. In… See details »

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